About Richard W. Amero

Richard W. Amero

Amero and Donal Hord’s Woman of Tehuantepec

Note: Richard Amero died in 2012. His book Balboa Park and the 1915 Exposition was published posthumously in 2013 by The History Press.

Richard Amero has been a San Diego resident for 56 years. He was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1924 and graduated from Gloucester High School in 1942. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and obtained the rank of corporal while acting as a clerk and courier for the Headquarters Commandant, Chanor Base Section, European Theater of Operations.

After his discharge from the Army in April, 1946, Amero worked part-time on the wharves of Gloucester, Massachusetts, where fishing is the dominant industry, and acted as a laborer for his carpenter/contractor father. Money from these jobs helped to defray costs at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, and Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. He graduated in 1950 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with a major in English and a minor in history. In San Diego, Amero continued his education by taking University of California Extension Classes in Mexican art and architecture

Amero worked at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft (Convair), which later became General Dynamics. He went into the Employment Office, announced that he had just graduated from college, and was hired immediately with no questions being asked. Such was the nature of wartime employment in San Diego. From Convair, Amero went on to Solar Aircraft for about six months. Upon hearing that San Diego Gas & Electric Company was hiring workers, Amero transferred there, where he served for 40 years. He started as a laborer and reached the position of technical analyst in Material Management before he left.

While he lived for many years near Balboa Park, the Park in those days was in a decrepit condition. Nevertheless, its green walks and pastures provided Amero with solace. His interest in the Park and in San Diego history began at this time and resulted in the writing of many letters-to-the-editor and the beginning of years of research.

Amero’s publications include several articles in the Journal of San Diego History and the San Diego Reader. When he retired from San Diego Gas & Electric Company in 1992, Amero gave the San Diego Historical Society the “Richard Amero Collection,” a compilation of over 250 binders of material on subjects pertaining to San Diego and California history and copies of correspondence by famous people associated with San Diego, gleaned from archives throughout the country.

Richard Amero believes that all people should strive to realize what they are and thinks this advice is the same as that given by Buddha, the sages of the Far East, Socrates, and the New England Transcendentalists. For San Diego, Amero envisions the great, prosperous, lively, and compassionate city dreamed by Kate Sessions, George W. Marston, Samuel Parsons, Jr., and John Nolen.

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  Richard Amero wrote @

Richard W. Amero has been a San Diego resident for 56 years. He was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1924 and graduated from Gloucester High School in 1942. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and obtained the rank of corporal while acting as a clerk and courier for the Headquarters Commandant, Chanor Base Section, European Theater of Operations.

After his discharge from the Army in April, 1946, Amero worked part-time on the wharves of Gloucester, Massachusetts, where fishing is the dominant industry, and acted as a laborer for his carpenter/contractor father. Money from these jobs helped to defray costs at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, and Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. He graduated in 1950 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with a major in English and a minor in history. In San Diego, Amero continued his education by taking University of California Extension Classes in Mexican art and architecture

Amero worked at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft (Convair), which later became General Dynamics. He went into the Employment Office, announced that he had just graduated from college, and was hired immediately with no questions being asked. Such was the nature of wartime employment in San Diego. From Convair, Amero went on to Solar Aircraft for about six months. Upon hearing that San Diego Gas & Electric Company was hiring workers, Amero transferred there, where he served for 40 years. He started as a laborer and reached the position of technical analyst in Material Management before he left.

While he lived for many years near Balboa Park, the Park in those days was in a decrepit condition. Nevertheless, its green walks and pastures provided Amero with solace. His interest in the Park and in San Diego history began at this time and resulted in the writing of many letters-to-the-editor and the beginning of years of research.

Amero’s publications include several articles in the Journal of San Diego History and the San Diego Reader. When he retired from San Diego Gas & Electric Company in 1992, Amero gave the San Diego Historical Society the “Richard Amero Collection,” a compilation of over 250 binders of material on subjects pertaining to San Diego and California history and copies of correspondence by famous people associated with San Diego, gleaned from archives throughout the country.

Richard Amero believes that all people should strive to realize what they are and thinks this advice is the same as that given by Buddha, the sages of the Far East, Socrates, and the New England Transcendentalists. For San Diego, Amero envisions the great, prosperous, lively, and compassionate city dreamed by Kate Sessions, George W. Marston, Samuel Parsons, Jr., and John Nolen.


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